You are here: Home / Asia

Gender and Rural Advisory Services Assessment in Pakistan

Assessment of FAIR data principles across the ACIAR research portfolio

FAIR data is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Recent studies have estimated a huge opportunity cost of not applying FAIR data principles and the positive impact of FAIR on potential economic annual growth.  The project helped the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) to consider the barriers of using and applying data and the application of FAIR principles in its investment portfolio and looked at opportunities to address them and ways to improve its grant-making processes. Through an extensive examination of data management and sharing within ACIAR and its investment projects, evidence was gathered on the perception, awareness and implementation of the FAIR data principles. Based on this evidence, CABI provided recommendations on how investment outcomes could benefit from improved data management and how the FAIR data principles could be implemented in ACIAR and across its investments to increase efficiencies and in-country benefits.

An assessment of the invasive species system in Bangladesh

Gender integration in the Plantwise programme: identifying strengths and limitations in Nepal

Enhancing technical capacity for monitoring and managing fall armyworm in Bangladesh

Fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda, is an incredibly highly invasive pest that feeds on over 80 plant species. Favouring maize and wheat, this caterpillar devastates crops and consequently affects the food security of smallholder farmers and the country. In Bangladesh, maize is the second most important crop which is grown on over 500,000 hectares. With the FAW’s ability to spread quickly, if not managed early, it can damage up to 80% of crops. In this project, CABI provided essential support in increasing the resilience of livelihoods in Bangladesh against the threats and crises caused by the FAW invasion in the country.  

Strengthening food security systems in Pakistan

Thirty-seven percent of Pakistan’s population is already vulnerable to food insecurity. This figure will soon exacerbate given the effect of recent external challenges including the rapid spread of Covid-19 and its subsequent Government restrictions, and Pakistan’s largest locust infestation in 25 years devasting large areas of agricultural land, including cotton, wheat, maize, and other crops. Adding to this turmoil is recent extreme weather events which have demonstrated that Pakistan’s food security and agriculture are critically exposed to the adverse impacts of climate change. In this project, CABI will support the Ministry of National Food Security and Research (MNFSR) and four provincial agriculture departments in adopting technologies and advanced practices to manage these impacts, disseminating technologies and practices to stakeholders and recommending measures for building long-term resilience and sustainable food security.